Y is for Y: The Last Man

Y: The Last Man is a comic book series written by Brian K. Vaughan and illustrated by Pia Guerra.  This Eisner Award winning series ran for 60 issues from 2002-2008.

The story follows Yorick Brown, a young man who suddenly finds himself to be the only human man left alive. After a strange phenomenon known as “the plague” kills off all organisms with a Y-chromosome, Yorick and his pet capuchin monkey, Ampersand, appear to be the only males left on the planet. As he heads out into the apocalyptic aftermath in search of his girlfriend, Beth, Yorick finds that, with the sudden disappearance of half the population, the world has been thrown into chaos. There are many theories thrown about as to why the men suddenly died off, and many different ideological factions arise. Yorick finds himself in danger as some groups wish him to be killed along with the rest of the men, but he soon meets a woman known as Agent 355, who protects him at the behest of a secret government agency known as the Culper Ring.

I read Y: The Last Man a few years ago, and was absolutely floored by how great it was. The series has so many twists and turns; the readers are in the dark just much as the characters. It’s truly an exciting piece of fiction that explores many interesting ideas and themes. I highly recommend you check it out! It has admittedly been awhile since I read it, but I remember loving it. Just in writing up this post, I’ve gotten extremely excited about re-visiting this fantastic series. I will certainly have to read it again soon!

Disclaimer: All images shown belong to Vertigo/DC Comics, the use of which have not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner.  This blog post is for non-commercial criticism and comment purposes only. I believe that this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of the copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the U.S. Copyright Law.

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S is for Scott Pilgrim

Scott Pilgrim is a six-part graphic novel series by Bryan Lee O’Malley, which was adapted into the 2010 film Scott Pilgrim vs. the World.  The titular Scott (portrayed in the movie by Michael Cera) is an unemployed Canadian in his early twenties who, at the start of the series, is dating a high school girl named Knives Chau (Ellen Wong).  As a slacker, a mooch, and all-around self-centered young man, Scott’s relationship is one of convenience rather than a true emotional connection.  His life is turned upside down when he meets Ramona Flowers (Mary Elizabeth Winstead), the girl of his dreams… literally.

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K is for Kamala Khan

“I don’t know what I’m supposed to do.  I don’t know who I’m supposed to be.”

“Who do you want to be?”

-Ms. Marvel Vol. 3, #1: No Normal

I didn’t grow up reading comics.  Most of my knowledge of all the iconic characters came via television and movies.  I watched Batman’s adventures on film thanks to Burton, Nolan, and, yes, Schumacher; and watched Terry McGinnis take up the cowl every Saturday morning in Batman Beyond.  While I never actually read them, I remember flipping through the pages of my Wolverine-obsessed cousins’ X-Men comics as a kid, looking at the pictures.  Then the film came out in 2000, and I would race home after school to learn more about the mutant heroes via reruns of the animated series.  And now, like many people, I am currently obsessed with every part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

All that to say, I love the stories and mythology of superheroes, but haven’t really experienced them in their original form — comic books.  I’ve read one or two here and there, (The Killing Joke comes to mind), but never followed a full story arc.  As a bit of a completist, the amount of backstory I would miss by jumping in now is disheartening. Comic book characters and storylines are so intertwined; it all seems so daunting as a new reader.  Because of this, I have heretofore stuck with non-superhero, non-Big Two comics/graphic novels. (For the curious: I’ve finished Scott Pilgrim and Y: The Last Man, dabbled in Fables, and am currently working my way through Saga.)

But this past year, I kept hearing about a new superhero.  That is, a new person taking up the mantle of an established hero.  A new character that felt different and fresh.  All the reviews were glowing, and the excitement surrounding this introduction spread like wildfire.  I am referring, of course, to the new Ms. Marvel.  A superhero whose alter-ego is a teenage, Muslim, Pakistani-American girl from Jersey City — Kamala Khan.

Ms. Marvel Vol. 3, #1: No Normal (via Marvel)

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A Thrilling podcast review from a normal human blogger

Hi, all my buddies!!!

It’s totally me – Wise the Simple!  Definitely not a strikingly beautiful, super clever spy from glorious Jupiter.

Hey, here’s a fun idea: how ‘bout you head on down to the comments and just, like, tell me all your secrets?  That’s totally something a normal blogger would suggest, right?  ‘Cuz that’s what I am, buddies!  A normal human blogger who’s obviously not, like, a shape-shifting Jupiter spy or anything.

So you take a mo and think of all your secrets.  (Take your time, take your time.)  And while you do that, I’ll let you know about this super cool podcast I’ve been listening to.  Ready?

*Ahem*

(Puts on announcer voice) Kids, shine your astro-spurs and set your radio’s dial to “spooky”, ‘cuz it’s time for a review of…

The Thrilling Adventure Hour! Continue reading